Sunday, October 4, 2009

Another look at the Wave

I was thinking today about Google's new Wave product and came to the conclusion that it may be right for only a certain target market. Google markets it as a medium of collaboration, with which I agree. Natalia pitched the idea to us as Google does, by proposing that it will be the next-level social networking service. I do not quite agree with Google's prediction and think that the Wave will not replace Facebook and/or other similar networking sites. I find it hard to believe that the new generation Facebook will involve people editing each other's posts and show, in real-time, what others are typing. The product seems to be more geared toward businesses that rely heavily on collaboration and discussion for innovation and product development. Google has integrated up-to-date business world necessities like a functional and effective translator as well as spell checking and word suggestion features, to me signaling that it is after businesses that operate and communicate nationally and internationally. It could be used to negotiate contracts and other important agreements or edit a presentation or speech. I simply cannot see myself using it to communicate with college peers and family members. What is your take on this product's future?

5 comments:

  1. I never really thought during our discussion that it could be used as a means for companies to go about their business. I think that your idea is very valid because being able to edit each others ideas without being in a room together could be a very useful tool to a lot of businesses, especially those that work on a international level. Like you I can't really see myself using it to communicate because it just seems a little bit too invasive. Anyways I just really like your idea that perhaps it is geared more towards businesses rather then individuals. Great idea Mattan.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I believe that this new product Google Wave is going to be more successful with the older generation. I can not see young adults and teens actually editing people's writing. I can see it more used for businesses and communication for jobs. I am unable to decide if this new product is an invasion of privacy but it is headed in that direction in my opinion.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Im taking a more generalized approach to this question. Regardless of the how Google Wave works, people will always look for newer forms of technology. We go through phases where we are obsessed with certain fads e.g. Facebook and Twitter. Eventually we will become tired of these and look for something new to entertain us. It's just in our nature. We tend to follow the crowd whether we admit it or not, so if people start using something else most of us will surely follow. It's just how our culture works. It's both beauty and travesty.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I can see how WAVE can be an asset to companies working in a collaborative environment. However the idea that someone else can edit your emails seems to me like it could be very, very wrong. I just don't want to write an email and have a vengeful (or even well meaning friend) distort my idea to the point where it sounds offensive. Often times we have to edit ourselves because what we say can be taken in different ways. By choosing the right words we make sure we convey the idea we wanted to convey instead of something that may be considered offensive. However (like Nhan said) we do adapt to new trends and eventually we will learn to love WAVE and forget how life was without it.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Google Wave has that potential to become much more than anything we can currently imagine, as it's open source, so anyone can make changes to the software. Email was once much simpler than it is today (no attachments, no pictures: just line after line of text). People from back when, say, the telegraph was invented, would have had trouble understanding IM or email, even though they're really the same thing: an electronic method of communication.

    ReplyDelete

Wider Two Column Modification courtesy of The Blogger Guide